Spadina in the Snow - Canon 5d w/200mm Spadina in the Snow - Canon 5d w/200mm

Toggle Original Image

Another shot from Saturday morning's heavy snowfall in Toronto. This image is a montage of 6 different frames taken with a 200mm prime lens. For a visual explanation take a look at this example I posted on Flickr.

After experimenting with showing the original vs the post-production images using a slider widget I've decided to make viewing the original image a more regular feature of this blog. To do that I am using a simple fade in and out rather than the slider widget. Whenever the original image is available you will see a link labeled "Toggle Original Image" above the description. Clicking on this will toggle between the two images.

I know more and more photoblogs are enabling this feature, especially after Dave at Chromasia adopted it, and I think it's a great trend. As I have time I'm going to be applying the feature to older posts. Follow me on Twitter to find out when I add this to posts. As always, if you have any questions about the image processing or technique feel free to ask.

Let me know if you experience any problems with the feature. Javascript needs to be enabled for it to work.

Oh, and I also added a "retweet" button.

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Comments

  • plópez

    a cold image not without a certain romanticism.

    2011-01-10

  • Ben

    Excellent montage. Did you use focus stacking in photoshop or how do you achieve this look?

    P.S. Thanks for the plug, Miles!

    2011-01-10

  • Miles

    Ben, since you posted I added a feature that allows you to compare the original. That should answer your question!

    2011-01-10

  • Stephen

    Miles, the blog shows both images at once, one above the other. when I click on the "Toggle Original Image" link, it sends me to a jpeg of the montage image and then I have to click "back" to return to the blog. It doesn't sound like that is the implementation you intended. I am using Chrome and have Java Scripts enabled.

    2011-01-10

  • Stephen

    After I posted the last comment, everything looked fine upon page reload. Hmm...

    2011-01-10

  • Ben

    Hey Miles, that is a great idea. Thanks for showing the original! Looks like an interesting technique to play with.

    2011-01-10

  • JohnG

    The Chrome browser displays the page incorrectly, with the preprocessing image set above and the combined one below. Reloading the page partially fixes it, but the button still takes you to a different page, containing just the preproc image set.

    Firefox and IE display them correctly, switching back and forth via the 'Toggle..' button.

    2011-01-10

  • Tom

    great idea and great photo miles, the before/after will make this blog even more interesting.

    2011-01-10

  • Barbara

    I'am using chrome 7 with JS enabled but it says that i have javascript disabled

    2011-01-10

  • Matt

    I actually love the overlayed images without blending them in properly. Like a proper old school montage. Definately going to have a play with that

    2011-01-10

  • Miles

    Thanks for the feedback. I can't repeat any errors in Chrome, it works fine for me in Chrome 7 and 8. I suspect that the problem lies in the CSS and perhaps JS files not being updated. I've seen this problem with Chrome before. I will rename both files to force the browser to pay attention.

    2011-01-10

  • marc

    Great feature Miles, I like it. I noticed that you took the Facebook "like" feature away. Don't like integrating with FB anymore?

    2011-01-10

  • Miles

    Hey Marc, thanks. The Facebook button should still be there, sometimes it takes a bit of time to load but it's coming from Facebook so I have no control over it!

    2011-01-10

  • Jingz

    beautiful and colorful bokeh :)

    2011-01-12

  • marc

    So it is, my bad Miles, I forgot that I had an extension that blocks FB on non-FB sites.

    2011-01-12

  • Claus Petersen

    Wonderful minimalism.

    2011-03-20

  • sergey

    i like the picture a lot (came across on Flickr) and forgive the dumb question - why do you need to compile it from 6 shots, when you could take just one? The technique is fun, however, could you maybe briefly explain how you do that?

    2011-11-24

  • Miles

    sergey, there are two reasons why I use this technique. Firstly it enables me to get a point of view that would otherwise not be possible with the lens I have on me - I almost always use prime lenses. Secondly, combining images in this manner allows me to produce a shallow depth of field that would also be impossible in a single shot. The lens I used here, an 85mm f/1.8, could not produce an image like this in a single shot. I would estimate that you'd need a lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.0 or greater.

    2011-11-24