Under the Gardiner - Canon 5d w/85mm

Under the Gardiner.

This is another example of an image made up of several shots with the 85mm to create a stronger depth of field than would be possible in a single frame.

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Comments

  • katherine

    I like it!

    2010-05-10

  • Be

    Weird, but cool box. Great DoF!

    2010-05-10

  • stavkove

    nice and simply.Great colours.

    2010-05-10

  • Jeff

    How do you put these shots together? Is it the same technique as an HDR shot?

    2010-05-10

  • tomms

    cool shot

    how many photos did you stitch together?

    2010-05-10

  • Miles

    Thanks!

    Jeff, the technique is basically the same one you use to create a panorama but you're stitching shots together both vertically and horizontally to create an image with a much wider field of view than you have standing there.

    Tomms, I think it was about 16 this time.

    2010-05-10

  • photo ex machina

    Where was this taken?

    2010-05-10

  • chernobog

    What is this city?

    2010-05-10

  • marc

    Great DOF and well stitched!

    Thanks for the "Shot of the Day" props.

    2010-05-10

  • Miles

    This was shot in Toronto. The exact location is under the Gardiner between Bathurst and Spadina, opposite the big red canoe.

    2010-05-10

  • Jeff

    Wild man. Wild.

    2010-05-10

  • Miguel

    Great shot and post-processing. I'll have to look up some "tutorials" online to see how you did that.

    Could you get a similar effect with a filter and a lens blur in Photoshop (like the tiltshift photos) ?

    2010-05-12

  • Miles

    Miguel, you can emulate the focal planes and depth of field with photoshop's blur filters (I've certainly tried in the past) but it never looks right. None of the blur filters can accurately recreate the look of actual blur, especially the 'bokeh' patterns (around highlights especially).

    The other advantage of creating an image in this way is that it's huge. My camera outputs 21mp images, these shots are made up of 12-16 such images. Even with all the overlapping the originals are still 40mp+. This only matters if you want to print huge of course but for wedding photogs, where I believe this technique originated, it's a selling point.

    2010-05-12

  • Miguel

    ah! very interesting!!! I definitively need to explore this technique a little more.

    Of course, you're right, the blur is far from optimal. It also treats the image as 2d... so it will blur things in the foreground as well as things in the background. You have to be careful.

    The technique you showcase here is way better! Thanks for sharing!!!

    2010-05-13